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International Commercial & Investment Arbitration Research: Getting Started

About

International commercial arbitration is a private dispute resolution mechanism for resolving cross-border commercial disputes, generally based on a contract between the parties. Investment arbitration is a dispute resolution method generally based on a bilateral investment treaty (BIT), a national investment law, or investment agreement.

This guide provides a comprehensive overview of primary and secondary sources that may be utilized to research the general topics of international commercial arbitration and international investment arbitration, as well as more specific sub-topics.  Included are introductory materials, bibliographies, treatises, commercial databases, and free websites.  Suggested resources for locating arbitral awards and decisions are also listed.

Bibliographies

Bibliographies of published materials related to international commercial arbitration are listed below. Note that not all listed publications are in English.

Online Translators

English translations of legal materials, including foreign statutes, are often difficult to locate and can be unreliable.  Only in rare instances are authoritative English translations available.  If authoritative versions are not available, look for "official" translations that are created by, or for, a government organization.  Further, look for synoptic translations, which allow for side-by-side comparisons of the vernacular with the English translation. 

Many online translators are available on the WWW, but these should be used with caution since web translators do not generally include specialized legal or commercial vocabulary.  Online translators, however, may be of some help in getting the general sense of a document or passage.  Examples of WWW translators are:

 

Introductory Material (Electronic)

The following guides to researching international commercial and investment arbitration are available on the WWW. 

Introductions to International Commercial Arbitration/Research (Print)

Law360: International Arbitration

Law360 is a popular legal news and current awareness resource covering over 40 different practice areas, including international commercial arbitration. The Law Library's Law360 subscription allows users to receive daily newsletter alerts on legal topics of their choosing. Law360 is available from any on campus computer, or from off campus with proxy authentication (current Loyola Law ID and password). For use by current students, faculty, and staff of Loyola University Chicago's School of Law only.

Howard M. Holtzmann Research Center for the Study of International Arbitration and Conciliation

The American Society of International Law (ASIL), headquartered in Washington, DC, launched the Center in 2013 to honor Judge Howard M. Holtzmann.  The Center houses a collection of research materials on international arbitration, including Judge Holtzmann’s personal library and papers. The Center also offers a regular program of events, including a speaker series featuring leading figures in the field of international arbitration. 

Subject Guide

Julienne Grant

PowerPoint Presentations

The following are PowerPoint presentations that were prepared for various LUC Law School courses related to international commercial arbitration.

HOW TO BREAK INTO ARBITRATION

This useful guide is designed for students and practitioners interested in entering the field of International Commercial Arbitration.  Included in the list are Young Arbitration Groups, publications, podcasts and websites, moots, newsletters and publications, blogs, and Facebook groups.  The list was compiled jointly by students of the Georgetown International Arbitration Society (“GIAS”) and members of the DC Bar International Dispute Resolution Committee. 

Print Research Guide

Prepared in the summer of 2009, and updated in February 2012, this 23-page guide offers instructions and tips on how to research foreign, comparative, and international law at the LUC Law Library.  The annotated guide lists print reference sources, subscription databases, free websites, and current awareness sources that may be useful when approaching foreign, comparative, and international law questions.